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Sister Corita - with love to the everyday miracle

Sister Corita was an artist and advocate for social justice whose work reflects the ascendancy of pop art, the spiritual renewal of the Second Vatican Council and the political activism of the 1960s. $15 (1 hr)
Category: @Annenberg Theater, Presentation, Talk, JUST ADDED

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$15.00

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Full Details

Nellie Scott, Director of the Corita Art Center, discusses the life of Corita Kent (Sister Mary Corita).    

Corita was an artist, educator, and advocate for social justice whose work reflects the ascendancy of pop art, the spiritual renewal of the Second Vatican Council and the political activism of the 1960s.  A Catholic nun for more than three decades, Kent was deeply committed to cultural, social, and aesthetic innovation. Her idiosyncratic approach to art and outspoken engagement with the world made her a target of criticism by conservative clergy but also secluded the reception of her work from more elite contemporary art circles.

Through her bold and colorful serigraphs, Corita shared ideas about faith, love, hope and justice, challenging racial and economic inequality at home, protesting the war abroad and pushing boundaries in the church and the art world.  She encouraged her students to engage with the world beyond the classroom, while Chair of the IHC Art Department, hosting events including the “Great Men Series,” at which Buckminster Fuller, Alfred Hitchcock, Charles Eames, John Cage and many other illustrious lecturers spoke.

During the 1960s, Corita had become a household name.  A 1967 issue of Newsweek featured her on the cover with the headline, “The Nun: Going Modern”. In 1968, Corita sought dispensation from her vows and relocated to Boston. Corita Kent, as she was known for the last 18 years of her life, continued her pioneering pop art screen prints, but also began working in watercolors and undertaking public art commissions.

Upon her death in 1986, she left her estate to the Immaculate Heart Community, which in turn created the Corita Art Center to keep her legacy alive.  With thousands of original serigraphs, watercolors and ephemera, the Corita Art Center is the largest and most comprehensive archive of Corita’s work.   The Center is currently working on the historical designation of her original L.A. studio, the place where she created some of her most iconic art and set the stage for the pop-art movement.

corita.org    YouTube

$15

Things to Know

This event is for ages 12 and older.
Local covid restrictions in effect at the time of the presentation will be respected.
The entrance to the Annenberg Theater is located behind the Annenberg Theater Box Office, adjacent to the Palm Springs Art Museum's North Parking Lot.
Ample free public parking is available in the multi-level public garage across from the Palm Springs Art Museum.
Handicap parking is available. This event is wheelchair accessible.
The organizer of this event is Modernism Week.

Event Check-in Location 

Annenberg Theater,  Palm Springs Art Museum, 101 N. Museum Dr., Palm Springs, CA 92262
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Photo Credits: Image Courtesy of the Corita Art Center

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